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Martin Harris

What editor Lou Varricchio is addressing in the editorial "More taxes and Montpelier’s budget mess", is the "Vermont anomaly" in which otherwise rational people vote against their own interests. more

Opinions

Until the ideological turmoil of the 1960s, America’s news media, both the traditional print newspapers and the then fairly new electronic news programs, found it critical to their professional credibility to correct substantial factual errors or omissions spoken, written, or carefully omitted, by newsworthy public figures. more

Opinions

Until the ideological turmoil of the 1960s, America’s news media, both the traditional print newspapers and the then fairly new electronic news programs, found it critical to their professional credibility to correct substantial factual errors or omissions spoken, written, or carefully omitted, by newsworthy public figures. more

Opinions

Drawing on the observation by the late Bay State politician Tip O’Neill—that all politics is local (mostly)—and on the title of a sordid 1970 Jack Nicholson drama about an upscale hero going downscale... more

Opinions

For most of American history, politicians at the state level didn’t presume to invade the private sector, to strategize about state-guided economic development, and then legislate in support of some particular focus. more

Opinions

A single recent event-sequence, largely unreported by the print-and-electronic mainstream media, but documented heavily in a one-time analysis by the Wall Street Journal, reveals a remarkable turn-around in what’s probably the single most important sector for national economic (and therefore social) well-being: energy. more

Opinions

A story from the Korean Wr had an infantry patrol wending its way across the rice paddies on the raised dikes between the flooded fields; when the young lieutenant in charge realized he was going it alone, in the wrong direction on the wrong dike, he splashed across the intervening paddy to reassume the lead and holler “follow me.” more

Opinions

In a quasi-historical rerun, the Green Mountain State now seems once again to have reached consensus on a long-range economic development objective, only to default before commitment. more

Opinions

As reports go, it could have been a lot pricier and harder-to-read, but it was quite enough anyway. That’s the recently-published Picus Report, which was commissioned to reassure the Golden Dome folks in Montpelier that their statewide school property tax­,starting with Act 60, and then son-of-60, Act 68, was equitable. more

Opinions

Once upon a time, Chicago was the hog butcher for the world and City of the Big Shoulders—now it’s the place where high-rise apartments are deemed adequate only for the Lakeshore Drive upper-income quintile but not for the lower (or no-) income quintile inland. more

Opinions

At last count, 26 states had legislatively expressed their disapproval of the mandate-to-purchase-health-insurance in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. more

Opinions

Recently a Middlebury reader of my weekly newspaper column emailed me to comment, in a sort of mini-analysis, about why his taxes, in such a small Vermont town, are so high. more

Opinions

In a now pretty much vanished Vermont, it was the practice of politicos to explain (slowly, of course, with an analogy even we could handle with some effort) that the state’s economy was like a three-legged milking stool, more

Opinions

In the pre-Lewis Carroll years a rabbit hole was just a rabbit hole, subterranean do-it-yourself housing excavated by members of the O. cuniculus species, but he gave it new meaning in his account of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. more

Opinions

Fourth estaters, even “common taters” like your Humble Scribe, are forever—like Gallic hogs snuffling for truffles—in search of the next juicy and evocative quote for use in the next brilliantly incisive newspaper column. more

Opinions

Thanks to entrepreneur Philo Farnsworth—whose invention of television made him wealthy more

Opinions

If you live in Vermont and use electricity (there’s a sector of the modern population which pretends to prefer not to) you pay—via an add-on to on your power bill—to support EfficiencyVermont, a quasi-public bureaucracy advocating for energy efficiency. more

Opinions

If you like historical ironies, consider this one: New Orleans acquired its present nickname—the Big Easy—in 1970 from the James Conaway eponymous novel. more

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Cultural anthropologists –even dissertation-subject-seeking grad students—haven’t yet analyzed the fairly-recently-evolved Fourth Estate tribe of media commentators, both print and (new mutation) electronic. more

Opinions

Consider the remarkable origins of the U.S. Progressive movement:  more

Opinions

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